The Neighborhood at a Glance

White Rock Hill is south of Franklin Hill and is bounded by Florida Avenue, the James River, and Fishing Creek. The hill was named for the outcropping of white quartz rocks along the bluff of the James River that were a well-known local landmark. A portion of the hill was incorporated into the city in 1870. Similar to Franklin Hill, steep hillsides prevented development and the area was not fully annexed into the city until 1908. 

 
White Rock Elementary School, built 1912 This school opened the same year as three other Lynchburg schools: Yoder, Miller Park, and the new Lynchburg High School on Park Avenue.  

White Rock Elementary School, built 1912
This school opened the same year as three other Lynchburg schools: Yoder, Miller Park, and the new Lynchburg High School on Park Avenue.  

White Rock Cemetery 

In 1885 Jackson Street Methodist Church established White Rock Hill Cemetery for African Americans on High Street. The seven acre cemetery was used by Jackson Street Methodist, Diamond Hill Baptist, and White Rock Baptist for over 100 years. Approximately 4,000 people are buried there, one of whom is believed to be Ota Benga, a pygmy from the Congo.  

White Rock Cemetery, founded 1885 The cemetery was active until the 1980s when regular maintenance of the graveyard ceased. Recently efforts have been made to clean up the cemetery, but many graves still remain overgrown. 

White Rock Cemetery, founded 1885
The cemetery was active until the 1980s when regular maintenance of the graveyard ceased. Recently efforts have been made to clean up the cemetery, but many graves still remain overgrown. 

Ota Benga he lived with faculty from the Virginia Seminary and College (now Virginia University of Lynchburg) and used to hunt in the woods nearby. One of Ota’s hunting companions was Chauncey Spencer, son of poet and librarian Anne Spencer.

Ota Benga
he lived with faculty from the Virginia Seminary and College (now Virginia University of Lynchburg) and used to hunt in the woods nearby. One of Ota’s hunting companions was Chauncey Spencer, son of poet and librarian Anne Spencer.