The Neighborhood at a Glance

The smallest of the city's seven hills, Federal Hill is bounded by step hills near 12th Street and valleys near 8th & Madison Streets. Originally outside the town's limits, Federal Hill could be called Lynchburg's first suburb as homes were building built there before 1819 when it was made part of the city. While the Federal Hill name shows up by 1839, its origin is not known. When the nation was first founded, leaders just as George Washington and John Adams were known as Federalists. The name may be related to this political party. 

John W. Carroll, successful tobacconist, built four Second Empire style homes for family members, ca. 1870s  

John W. Carroll, successful tobacconist, built four Second Empire style homes for family members, ca. 1870s
 

John Carroll

In the 1870s, John Carroll, owner of Lone Jack Tobacco Company, built a home on Harrison Street for himself and three others for his children. All were built in the Second Empire style with mansard roofs.  

Lynchburg High School/Franke Roane Elementary, built 1899 Designed by architect Edward G. Frye, it was one of the largest high schools in Virginia when it opened in 1899.

Lynchburg High School/Franke Roane Elementary, built 1899 Designed by architect Edward G. Frye, it was one of the largest high schools in Virginia when it opened in 1899.

Lynchburg High School 

Also on Federal Street stands Lynchburg High School, built in 1899. Later used as Frank Roane Elementary School, this large buff brick building is now apartments.

Lucy Norvell Otey, created and operated the Ladies Relief Hospital during the Civil War where the mortality rate was lower than at other hospitals in the City.

Lucy Norvell Otey, created and operated the Ladies Relief Hospital during the Civil War where the mortality rate was lower than at other hospitals in the City.

Lucy Otey

During the Civil War, seven of Lucy's sons fought for the South, with three of them and her only son-in-law dying. She was widow by 1861 and founded the Ladies Relief Hospital on Main Street. She and other Lynchburg women had to fight Confederate authorities to operate a hospital for soldiers.