The Neighborhood at a Glance

Known as White House Hill before the college was built, the general boundaries of College Hill are Expressway, Kemper Street Railroad Station, and Old City Cemetery. It adjoins Federal and Diamond Hills making it the largest of the seven hills. 

 
The first lynchburg college

The first lynchburg college

What College?

College Hill has no college today. Named for the first Lynchburg College (no connection to the current college) which only lasted from 1855-1861, this military college stood near 11th & Wise Streets. When the Civil War erupted in 1861, most of the faculty and students joined the Confederate army and the school closed. 

 
 
anne spencer's home and gardens are located on pierce street

anne spencer's home and gardens are located on pierce street

The Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer (1882-1975)

Only the second African American to be included in Norton's Anthology of Modern Poetry (1973), Anne Spencer was a poet, civil rights activist, librarian, mother, and avid gardener. During the era of Jim Crow she entertained notables including George Washington Carver, W.E.B. Dubois, and Langston Hughes. She helped found the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP and served as the librarian at Dunbar High School for over 20 years. Her house and garden are Virginia Historic Landmark and can be found on the National Register of Historic Places. 


Lame Lion of Lynchburg

College Hill is home to one of the few examples of public art in the city. John Warwick Daniel suffered a major leg wound during the Civil War and was known as the "Lame Lion of Lynchburg" when he served in the Virginia and US senates. The triangle of land bounded by Park Avenue, Floyd Street, and 9th Street where his bronze statue was erected was the highest point in the city in 1870.

statue of john warwick daniel

statue of john warwick daniel


1018 wise street built in 1849 

1018 wise street built in 1849 

A Number of Fine Homes

A number of fine homes were built in College Hill between 1815-1845 including the home of Confederate General Robert Rodes. Christopher Lynch, son of city founder John Lynch, operated a brick yard at 7th & Jackson Streets and his brick was almost surely used to build many of the early houses on the hill.